Tank Blanketing Regulators

Low-pressure reducing and relief valves regulate pressures in mbar range and serve the inertisation and blanketing of containers, reactors, stirrer vessels, centrifuges, etc. with inert gas such as nitrogen.

Highlights

  • Regulating pressures up to 1000 mbar
  • Nominal diameters DN15 – DN100
  • DN15 – DN50 PN16
  • DN80 – DN100 PN10
  • 1/2″-4″ ANSI/ASME 150 lbs
  • Counterpressure-resistant up to 2 bar
  • Vacuum-resistant
  • Stainless steel regulators
  • Nickel alloy regulators
  • Clean regulators
  • Low-maintenance (friendly)
  • ATEX optional
Category:

Description

Inertisation

For discontinuous batch processes before process start, the reactor chamber is rendered inert. The inertisation of spaces describes the process to displace the oxygen in the air or other reactive or explosive gases or gas compounds by adding of inert gas.

Picuture of regulator in use

Ventilation/Blanketing

Aim of ventilation/protective gas blanketing is maintaining the inert condition inside the reactor, tank or container during the manufacturing process.

TankBlanketingRegulatorTechSpec

 

 Reducing Regulator Function
Reducing Regulator Operation Spring-loaded pressure reducing regulators are “relative pressure regulators”, designed to keep the process pressure “B” at a constant level. The nominal pressure is set by means of the setscrew, located at the spring housing. When at rest, the regulator remains in an open position. When the pressure “A” rises, pressure is released through the open valve seat “F” to the process side of the valve and through the internal feedback bore “E” underneath the diaphragm. This will continue, until the diaphragm force “C” exceeds the spring force “D”, while the process pressure “B” rises. The diaphragm is lifted and the vale seat “F” closes. In the event that the process pressure “B” drops below the preadjusted nominal pressure, the spring force “D” presses the diaphragm downwards, so that the valve seat “F” opens and admits gas until pressure equalization is reached again.
 Relief Valve Function
Relief Valve Operation Spring-loaded relief valves are “relative pressure regulators”, designed to keep the process pressure “A” at a constant level. The nominal pressure is set by means of the setscrew, located at the spring housing. When at rest, the regulator remains in a closed position. When the process pressure “A” increases, pressure is released through the internal feedback bore “E” underneath the diaphragm. If the diaphragm force “C” exceeds the spring force “D” the valve seat “F” opens and the over pressure is discharged to the vent side “B”. If the process pressure “A” drops, the diaphragm force “C” is lower compared to the spring force “D” and the valve seat “F” closes. The pressure in the vent line can be atmospheric or vacuum. With vacuum in the vent line the flow capacity of the regulator is increased.